About Wanda Adams Fischer

Following a nearly 40-year career in public relations/marketing/media relations, Wanda Adams Fischer parlayed her lifelong love of baseball into her first novel, Empty Seats, released at the end of October 2017. She's a graduate of Northeastern University in Boston, where she completed her degree while working full-time as a secretary at MIT.

During her love affair with baseball, she's met many professional and up-and-coming players, including Hall of Famers Harmon Killebrew and Jim Rice, as well as Negro League great Buck O'Neill. She's also a regular at minor-league games and has watched the struggles of numerous talented players as they make their way through the ranks--some successful, some who drop out due to the challenges they face. In 2012, she auditioned to become the public address announcer at Fenway Park, and, although she didn't get the job, she made the final cut and announced a complete nine-inning game at Fenway between the Red Sox and Minnesota Twins on August 5, 2012.  She readily admits to her baseball crushes on David "Big Papi" Ortiz, Pedro Martinez and current World Series champion Jose Altuve.

In addition to writing and baseball activities, she's been a radio broadcaster since 1975, presenting a folk music show on non-commercial radio stations in Worcester and Albany, NY. Currently, her show, "The Hudson River Sampler," has been running since September 18, 1982 on WAMC, the Albany-based National Public Radio affiliate, and has earned a national reputation among folk and acoustic musicians. She's an accomplished folk musician/singer/songwriter and released her own CD, "Singing Along with the Radio," several years ago.

She's involved in animal rescue and also plays competitive senior United States Tennis Association tennis.

Wanda lives with her husband of 45 years, Bill Fischer, a retired physician, in Schenectady, New York. They have two grown children and four grandchildren.

 

 

Wanda Adams Fischer’s Books

Empty Seats

In 1972, they were stars in their hometowns. Then they were drafted to play minor league baseball, thinking it would be an easy ride to the big time. Little did they know they’d be vying for a spot with every other talented kid who aspired to play professional baseball. Young, inexperienced, immature, far away from… [Read More]

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