Dear Editor: What If I Don’t See Eye to Eye With My Editor?

—(Originally appeared in Publishers Weekly)— BookWorks founder and CEO, Betty Kelly Sargent, is a veteran editor with over 30 years experience in traditional publishing. In her monthly column, she answers questions submitted by readers. Here she advises an author who’s locking horns with his own editor. Dear Editor: What should I do when I disagree… [Read More]

When you disagree with your book editor by Betty Kelly Sargent for BookWorks.com

—(Originally appeared in Publishers Weekly)—

When you disagree with your book editor by Betty Kelly Sargent for BookWorks.comBookWorks founder and CEO, Betty Kelly Sargent, is a veteran editor with over 30 years experience in traditional publishing. In her monthly column, she answers questions submitted by readers. Here she advises an author who's locking horns with his own editor.

Dear Editor:

What should I do when I disagree with my editor? It seems to be happening more and more.

—Adam

The primary job of an editor is to bring out the best in the manuscript she is working on: to make it the most excellent version of your work, not hers. If you feel that your editor is not respecting your voice, doesn’t really understand your subject matter, or is just plain wrong, then tell her.

Take These Steps If You and Your Editor DisagreeWhen you disagree with your book editor by Betty Kelly Sargent for BookWorks.com

Not all editors are as talented as Maxwell Perkins, and even he probably made suggestions his authors refused to accept. Good editors are sensitive to authors’ language, voice, and goals. If you don’t feel that your editor has these qualities, then move on if you can. But, if the choice isn’t yours because you’ve been assigned an editor by your publisher, I’d follow this three-step formula: think about what she is suggesting for a day or two and allow for the possibility that her change may improve the manuscript; discuss it with her and listen carefully to her reasoning; if you still disagree and she refuses to honor your request, then move on—find a new editor yourself if you are working on your own, or ask for your publisher’s advice.

Try Not to Make It Personal

When you disagree with your book editor by Betty Kelly Sargent for BookWorks.comTry to remember that what she is offering is not intended as personal criticism but as professional insight into what could make your manuscript stronger. Whether you decide to take it or leave it should be entirely up to you. It will be your name on the cover of your book, not hers.


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