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Dear Editor: When and How Do I Ask for a Manuscript Review?

(Originally appeared in Publisher’s Weekly) BookWorks founder and CEO, Betty Kelly Sargent, is a veteran editor with over 30 years experience in traditional publishing. In her new monthly column, she answers questions submitted by readers. In this month’s post, she addresses the best way to approach manuscript review…. Dear Editor: It’s an ongoing challenge to… [Read More]

Dear Editor: manuscript review by Betty Kelly Sargent for BookWorks.com

(Originally appeared in Publisher's Weekly)

BookWorks founder and CEO, Betty Kelly Sargent, is a veteran editor with over 30 years experience in traditional publishing. In her new monthly column, she answers questions submitted by readers. In this month's post, she addresses the best way to approach manuscript review....

Dear Editor: manuscript review by Betty Kelly Sargent for BookWorks.comDear Editor:

It’s an ongoing challenge to get people to read drafts of my work. It’s a big ask and puts considerable pressure on generous readers. Any thoughts on how early to engage readers for feedback on a work in progress?

—E. L. Kelly

It’s always a good idea to show your work to a few trusted readers before sending it out into the world. You want it to be the best that it can be. But because, as you point out, asking for feedback is a big ask, I suggest that authors wait until they’ve completed first drafts before showing their manuscripts to anyone. The following are three important things to keep in mind when you’re ready to ask for advice.

How to Get the Most From a Manuscript ReviewDear Editor: manuscript review by Betty Kelly Sargent for BookWorks.com

1 -  Choose people who know a lot about your subject matter: if you’ve written a sci-fi novel you probably don’t want to seek feedback from a gardening book author.

2 -  Ask the reader to be scrupulously honest—otherwise what’s the point?

3 -  Accept the suggestions that ring true for you, and discard the rest—in other words, always trust your instincts: it’s your book, your vision, your name will be on the title page, you are the creator and the artist.

As Neil Gaiman said in his “Eight Rules for Writing,” published in the Guardian in 2010: “Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong.”


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