7 Book Marketing Trends Authors Should Expect in 2017

The world of book marketing is moving and shaking, and as with all things, change is inevitable. Part of my job is to embrace change and ensure that we are on the front edge of book marketing trends so that we can be the most effective marketing team for our clients. And although change doesn’t… [Read More]

7 book marketing trends for 2017 by Penny Sansevieri for BookWorks.com

7 book marketing trends for 2017 by Penny Sansevieri for BookWorks.comThe world of book marketing is moving and shaking, and as with all things, change is inevitable. Part of my job is to embrace change and ensure that we are on the front edge of book marketing trends so that we can be the most effective marketing team for our clients. And although change doesn’t mean the “old ideas” no longer work, it does mean that there are some exciting new ways to do things. Here are 7 changes you can expect to see this year.

Collaborative Book Marketing

While not a necessarily new, this is one of the book marketing trends I think you’re going to start seeing a lot more of this in 2017. In the past, we’ve seen authors do combo book bundles—books bundled together from a variety of authors. In addition to that, I think we will see more collaborative marketing efforts such as bundled freebies, samplers, and joint ads. There is power in numbers and this year, more than ever, we’re going to start seeing that this type of networking is no longer an option, but a necessity.

7 book marketing trends for 2017 by Penny Sansevieri for BookWorks.com

Less Social Media

People are getting social media weary.  I even know of a few authors who have completely closed several social accounts. I think in 2017, more and more authors are going to get away from being everywhere. We have one author, for example, who went from being on six platforms to only two,  and instead of doing a public Facebook account, she now has a members-only VIP group.

Seasonal Romances

The Hallmark Channel is known for their marketing focus. If you follow them or have ever seen a Hallmark Christmas movie (it’s ok to admit that you have), you’ll notice that nearly all of their movies are now tied to a season. And while this trend began in television, it has now extended to books; I’m seeing more and more romances with seasonal angles: New Year’s Eve, summer holidays like Memorial Day and July 4th, Halloween, Thanksgiving, and of course, Christmas. Then the cycle starts all over again. And while I focused on romances here, it’s not unreasonable for this trend to reach further into genre fiction, too.

7 book marketing trends for 2017 by Penny Sansevieri for BookWorks.com

Print Books on the Rise

Print books will pick up steam again (but not for fiction): Interesting to note that so much of what’s being sold in fiction is not in print, meaning that eBooks are killing it in genre fiction. Dataguy from Digital Book World talks about this in his report: http://digitalbookworldconference.com/index.php/whitepaper. He notes that 70% of adult fiction sales were from eBooks. Seventy percent. And, in fact, several major publishing houses have set up digital-only divisions for this very reason. But for nonfiction, I’m seeing a totally different trend. Print is still a strong staple of the nonfiction market. If you’ve released a book in eBook only, maybe now is a good time to put it out in print, too—a new edition can give you some new promotional opportunities.

Mobile: Do It or Die

You need a site that is designed for mobile, even if it’s just adding a WordPress plugin. Mobile can’t and shouldn’t be ignored, but if you don’t get this handled in 2017, you’re going to lose a lot (a lot) of potential traffic and new readers. Plus, your book covers MUST look good on mobile browsers. If you have to pinch and pull the screen to be able to even see what your cover looks like or how it reads, you may be in trouble. Most new readers will simply move on.

7 book marketing trends for 2017 by Penny Sansevieri for BookWorks.com

The Long Haul

We love viral, I mean who doesn’t? That thing that gets everyone talking, like the Gilmore Girls reunion. But with so many books being put out daily, this kind of “magic” is going to become rarer. 7 book marketing trends for 2017 by Penny Sansevieri for BookWorks.comThis doesn’t mean that books won’t sell well, but it’s much more about the long haul.  It’s time to prepare for the “after the honeymoon” phase, post 90-day mark when you’d normally expect to see things take off. That’s just not realistic anymore. More and more in my firm, I see authors spending their budget dollars very wisely. They pace themselves and their resources because short, power bursts just aren’t getting the kind of traction they used to. I’m seeing this a lot in the way of eBook promotions. Remember when you used to be able to do one eBook price discount and see a flood of sales? Now I’m seeing authors do two and three of these to hit the same numbers. It’s all about saturation and if you stick with it, your book will hit its stride. Bottom line: This is one of the book marketing trends you should embrace, so prepare for the long term and don’t give up.

The Netflix Effect

Some years ago, I talked about how Netflix was going to start reinvigorating old shows. We see this with a number of 90's hit shows that have made recent comebacks, but what Netflix has also done is create “binge watching” an often-used term. This has turned serialized content on its head with sites like Wattpad really pulling in the views. As authors, we should be doing something in serialization.  And due to the growth of audio books, I think the next level of this might be serialized audio content. So, consider a chapter a week or a day, dumped into a subscriber feed (sort of like a podcast) to help you build listeners and maybe entice them to buy the full audio book version or your print book. Be aware that while doing this could be a lot of fun, you’d better have a good reading voice to pull it off.

7 book marketing trends for 2017 by Penny Sansevieri for BookWorks.com

Book Marketing Trends Will Shift

Although it’s hard to say whether or not all of these things will come to pass in 2017, you may be surprised to learn that many of them are already happening. It can be hard to see too far ahead, but again, the one thing that’s certain in book marketing (and life) is change. Don’t get caught by surprise when things you know to work well are no longer as effective (although most likely they will still work to a degree). The key to success in 2017 is your willingness to change with the times.


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2 thoughts on “7 Book Marketing Trends Authors Should Expect in 2017”

  1. There’s a most depressing trend that I see when I walk on a nearby college campus. That’s all the students with their faces buried in their smartphones, reading what you might call extremely short-form literature, meaning texts from friends. Often they’re ignoring the chance to talk a friend seated next to them to text someone far away. Crazy, utterly crazy.

    When they graduate, will they be able to read anything as long as a book, especially when there’s no teacher insisting that they do so? I don’t know. I have noticed that reading a lot of short articles online has impacted my own ability to read books for long periods of time. I keep waiting for chapters in books to end.

    My marketing adaptation is to write shorter chapters. In the four, practical and realistic books that I have written for my hospital series, I’ve tightly focused each chapter on a particular theme, doing my best to keep it under 2,000 words. For _My Nights with Leukemia_, most chapters are about a single child with leukemia that I cared for. For _Embarrass Less_, each chapter focuses on a specific embarrassment issue that hospital staff are likely to face. Also, since webpages typically include pictures along with text, each chapter opens with a picture illustrating that chapter’s topic.

    Yes, I know that in the long term this trend is not a healthy one. It’s usually easy to break what I’m writing into 2,000 word slices that resemble webpages. Doing that actually increases my focus. But there’s no way to deal with the issues that I faced caring for children with cancer or teens recovering from major surgeries with a 160-word tweet. That would be horrible.

    That’s why I go out of my way to bash Amazon Rapids, which assumes children want short stories written like messages between people. It’s bad, because that’s a woefully restrictive way to write. I suspect the idea will bomb badly. That’s hinted at by Amazon’s price-cutting for the plan. But if it does succeed, that’s even worse. There’ll be kids growing up whose reading ability will be restricted to what Amazon describes as: “Stories are told through the lens of characters chatting with each other, letting stories come to life one message at a time.”

    https://rapids.amazon.com

    The good news is that Amazon typically drops ideas that fail to make money. “Dozens added every month”—which probably means about one or two new stories a day—doesn’t suggest the idea is popular with writers either.

    –Michael W. Perry, Inkling Books, Auburn, AL

  2. Michael thanks for this thoughtful comment, it’s greatly appreciated. And I agree about Amazon – they run with things for a while and when they don’t sale, they quietly go away. Best of luck to you!

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